Home About us Editorial board Ahead of print Current issue Search Archives Submit article Instructions Subscribe Contacts Login 
ARTICLE
Year : 2011  |  Volume : 9  |  Issue : 18  |  Page : 436-439

Difference in oral health and oral health behavior between individuals with high and low dental fear


1 Senior Lecturer, Dept. of Public Health Dentistry, People's College of Dental Sciences and Research Centre, Bhopal, Madhya Pradesh, India
2 Professor, Dept. of Public Health Dentistry, People's College of Dental Sciences and Research Centre, Bhopal, Madhya Pradesh, India
3 Professor and Head, Dept. of Public Health Dentistry, People's College of Dental Sciences and Research Centre, Bhopal, Madhya Pradesh, India

Correspondence Address:
Sudhanshu Saxena
Senior Lecturer, Dept. of Public Health Dentistry, People's College of Dental Sciences and Research Centre, Bhopal, Madhya Pradesh
India
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


Rights and PermissionsRights and Permissions

Background: Numerous studies have demonstrated that dental fear is associated with poorer dental visiting, deteriorated oral health, low quality of life, and low self esteem. Objectives: (1) To assess the prevalence of dental fear among Indian adults (2) To explore the differences in oral health, oral hygiene and dental visit habits between individuals with high and low dental fear. Materials and Methods: A total of 2000 individuals aged 21 years and above were invited to participate in the study. The method of data collection comprised clinical measurements and self administered questionnaire. Dental fear was measured using the Corah dental anxiety scale. Oral health status was assessed by Simplified Oral Hygiene Index, Decayed, Missing, Filled teeth and; Filled and Sound teeth. Data was statistically analyzed by Student's t tests, Chi-square tests, and multivariate analysis. P value was considered statistically significant. Results: The percentage of individuals with high dental fear varied between from 3.9% to 7.8%. Dental fear had significant effect on filled and sound teeth when adjusted for the other variables. Conclusion: Dental fear is one part of the process determining oral health in different age groups. There is a need to identify and effectively tackle dental fear as an important step in improving oral health of the population.


[PDF]*
Print this article     Email this article
 Next article
 Previous article
 Table of Contents

 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
 Citation Manager
 Access Statistics
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert *
 Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed330    
    Printed6    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded83    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal