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ARTICLE
Year : 2011  |  Volume : 9  |  Issue : 18  |  Page : 792-802

Oral piercing and oral trauma - A review


1 Professor, Dept. of Public Health Dentistry, The Oxford Dental College, Bengaluru, India
2 P.G. Student, Dept. of Public Health Dentistry, The Oxford Dental College, Bengaluru, India
3 Professor and Head, Dept. of Public Health Dentistry, The Oxford Dental College, Bengaluru, India

Correspondence Address:
N Vanishree
Professor, Dept. of Public Health Dentistry, The Oxford Dental College, Bengaluru
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


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Aesthetics has become an important issue over the past few years and has led to the development of new materials and techniques in dentistry. Body decoration has also gained influence. Irreversible changes to the human body have been practised by ancient as well as modern civilizations for a variety of reasons. Some changes are made to express spiritual devotion or dedication to magic, to fulfil social demands, to make a personal statement or to enhance individual sex appeal. Some of these procedures such as skin tattooing, branding and body piercing that were used by ancient civilisations are commonly seen today especially in developing countries. Body piercings, in particular, have been extended to all parts of the human body and can be found to be adorned by members of all socioeconomic groups. Of special interest to oral health professionals is the recent worldwide increase in intraoral piercings at sites such as the lip, tongue, cheek, frenum and uvula. Depending on the piercing area, specific complications involving the hard and soft tissues have been observed, including tooth fractures, gingival recession, tooth sensitivity and gingival trauma. In addition, speech impairement, interference with mastication and swallowing, aspiration, infection, allergic responses, haematoma and prolonged bleeding have also been occured. Therefore, dentists and oral and maxillofacial surgeons should be aware and advise patients with oral and facial piercings or those who plan to acquire this type of body art. Hence this paper reviews the oral piercing, types of oral piercing and its complications.


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